Horse Affiliate Programs

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Dog.com on FlexOffers

Affiliate Program: Dog.com
Payout: 6.40%
Network: FlexOffers   - Join FlexOffers
Description:
Dog.com is your online dog supplies shopping and information destination. This site provides community forums and partnerships with several national and local rescue and adoption facilities. This program offers a 30-day cookie duration.
Category: Pets,Pets and Animal Services
Offer terms: The payout is 6.4% of sales.

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FlexOffers.com is an affiliate marketing network that provides comprehensive solutions to both advertisers and publishers via multiple marketing options, flexible data delivery, and profitable partnerships. Join FlexOffers.com as a publisher to receive access to millions of products and services through various affiliate marketing channels that can be promoted through our content feeds, text links, templates, and many more available applications. Advertisers who join FlexOffers.com will gain access to an affiliate publishing network that offers controlled online advertising growth by complying with established marketing standards while expanding market potential.

Make money from your website when you promote products and services through the FlexOffers.com affiliate marketing network. FlexOffers.com has the latests products, promotions and online-only offers from well-known brands and niche advertisers alike. FlexOffers.com affiliate marketing content can be easily integrated into any site as banner ads or text links, or as product marketing content created by our editorial staff. FlexOffers.com also offers customizable marketing templates designed to turn any website into an online store.
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Horse.com Description


The horse (Equus ferus caballus) is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. These feral populations are not true wild horses, as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski's horse, a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse. There is an extensive, specialized vocabulary used to describe equine-related concepts, covering everything from anatomy to life stages, size, colors, markings, breeds, locomotion, and behavior. Horses' anatomy enables them to make use of speed to escape predators and they have a well-developed sense of balance and a strong fight-or-flight response. Related to this need to flee from predators in the wild is an unusual trait: horses are able to sleep both standing up and lying down. Female horses, called mares, carry their young for approximately 11 months, and a young horse, called a foal, can stand and run shortly following birth. Most domesticated horses begin training under saddle or in harness between the ages of two and four. They reach full adult development by age five, and have an average lifespan of between 25 and 30 years. Horse breeds are loosely divided into three categories based on general temperament: spirited "hot bloods" with speed and endurance; "cold bloods", such as draft horses and some ponies, suitable for slow, heavy work; and "warmbloods", developed from crosses between hot bloods and cold bloods, often focusing on creating breeds for specific riding purposes, particularly in Europe. There are more than 300 breeds of horse in the world today, developed for many different uses. Horses and humans interact in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits, as well as in working activities such as police work, agriculture, entertainment, and therapy. Horses were historically used in warfare, from which a wide variety of riding and driving techniques developed, using many different styles of equipment and methods of control. Many products are derived from horses, including meat, milk, hide, hair, bone, and pharmaceuticals extracted from the urine of pregnant mares. Humans provide domesticated horses with food, water and shelter, as well as attention from specialists such as veterinarians and farriers.

Horse.com Terms


Payout Rates:
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5% Calculated Rate